Some resolutions

First day of my ‘control-what-you-eat’ resolution and I’m feeling good! I’ve eaten way too many croissants (breakfast AND lunch), but, on the other hand, no eating in the afternoon at work. Managed to gobble an apple down instead of some sweets that were lying around and felt very proud of myself.

On an even better note: I haven’t eaten anything besides dinner at home, and even managed to get a tangerine down my throat (one that Jasmijn decided she didn’t want to eat today… sigh) as a dessert. Result: two pieces of fruit in my first no sugar/no eating around day. Way to go!

I’ve realized resolutions are things we have to construct as we go. You make one general realistic decision and stick to it. And as soon as you get one step under control, you move to the next level. So instead of deciding I’ll loose all my weight and keep it off (not realistic decision, ever! unless it’s a resolution that will take over your life for good, for a looooooong time, which realisticly speaking almost never happen), I’ve made the resolution of controling what I eat and slowly getting back into track (to my pre-surgery eating habits some 8-9 years ago – an NO, it was not a sex change surgery, ok?). It’s a more realistic goal.

So REALISTIC is the word. I haven’t even come up with the concept. I actually “copied” from Dr. Phil McGraw, whom I admire more every day. I never thought I would turn into one of those people who turn to self-help books and programs, but I do think he’s right in many things. Besides, if I am not the one doing things for myself, who will? I cannot expect the world to evolve around me forever, even if we, human beings, have this inner perception going on. I have to think my world evolves around me and work on that.

Another resolution is to check on the possibility of going back to school in a year or two. This time to do Pedagogy (Pedagogiek), another more realistic goal for the time being. In a way I’m still mourning my decision of stopping with the Pabo, but it’s not realistic in terms of how much work I need to do to obtain a small result. The effort was not compensating the results. And the toll it took on my family was really getting into me. And into Ruud. And Jasmijn. Pedagogiek is still a course related to education, school and children in school age, but as a professional you don’t have to give lessons. You follow children and their parents through their problems at school and at home and help them solve them. Still an interesting thing to do.

A third resolution was to follow a course that doesn’t necessarily lead to a better pay-check. Of course that’s we all wish for at the end, as long as you also enjoy what you’re doing. So the idea is to do a course I will enjoy and that will enrich myself, my life and the lives of those around me. Including hubby and daughter.

A fourth one (don’t they ever stop?) is to make me some schedules and follow them. I really need to follow a more stablished routine. Because of myself, but mostly because of Jasmijn. I usually allow myself not to do what I should. Need to stop that and get straight. Even if following plans to the risk is not one of my best traits. But then again I do usually follow plans in a reasonably good way. And to the point. Normally with good results. But I do need to have a plan first…

There are more, but I’m not going to list them now. I’m tired and I’m really not in the mood to dwell too much on them. I’ve already lost enough sleep over a few of them and if I go on with that, will loose some more…

On a lighter note, today I gave Melissa my list of the best 5 books I’ve read in 2006:

  1. Q & A, by Vikas Swarup (very good one)
  2. Memories of my Melancholy Whores, by Gabriel García Márquez (very good one too)
  3. Quase Tudo, by Danusa Leão (quite interesting. Brazilian journalist/socialite etc)
  4. Urban Shaman, by E.C. Murphy (the world needs some healing fantasy kind of read)
  5. Memory in Death, by J.D. Robb (nice pretenseless light read)

Note they were some of the books I read in 2006, but actually they were most of the books I read then, since until July I just didn’t have the time to read anything besides school literature. After that my brain was a bit too mushy and couldn’t register much. It only started working sort of well again a couple of months ago…

I haven’t mentioned the obvious: The Alchemist, by Paulo Coelho was the biggest waste of time ever. But since Sophie had mentioned it, I thought it wasn’t necessary to put more salt on the wound. Right? Wrong! I should have said something!

Ah well, next time then……………..

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Resoluções (de novo ano também)

Coisas que quero fazer num futuro não muito distante:

  • escrever livros/romances
  • pintar
  • desenhar
  • quilting
  • patchwork
  • bordar
  • ponto cruz
  • caligrafia
  • aprender a trabalhar com madeira
  • trabalhar com barro
  • aprender a costurar
  • escalar (indoors)
  • scrapbooking
  • Power Point:
    – album Jasmijn
    – album trouwdag
    – e o que mais surgir na cabeça
  • cozinhar:
    – novos pratos
    – sopas
    – pães
    – bolos

Me organizar…

Things that have to happen

I’ve been trying to move my ass into gear for quite some now, and I don’t seem to be able to do it at the moment. I need to find out why I’m so stubornly fighting my own desire of losing weight. I’m not happy do way I look now but I just can’t make myself getting into the diet mood. I think the grey weather has a lot to do with it, but some of it is my uttermost fear: success. Weird, isn’t it? But it does happen to people…

There are a few things I need to do, anyway:

  • put myself into gear
  • having a healthy daily routine with Jasmijn
  • eat healthier than I’m doing now
  • follow certain instincts
  • certainly following my heart
  • write, write, write!
  • throw away caution and simply try things out
  • free my imagination

And I can’t forget my deep wish to have a new laptop. Mine has gone bonkers and is getting worse every day: it’s old, I cannot instal anything new and the screen is dead for quite a few years. I’m still thinking about it though. Quite a lot of money.

I’ve gotten a whole list of books…

to help me write about the Netherlands and all, but they are so many that sometimes it is too much. And since I’ve started with that NaNoWriMo thing, there’s no coming to my main idea of writing about my life here. Ah, well, I guessed (and guessed right, I should tell) it would just help me clearing up the thoughts and open my mind to different possibilities.

  • Dutch Sense, by Ayoodeji O. (historical info)
  • Murder in Amsterdam, by Ian Buruma (about Theo Van Gogh etc.)
  • Dealing with the Dutch, by Jacob Vossestein (a bit obvious, right?)
  • Culture Shock! Netherlands, by Janin & Van Eil (survival guide, full with how-tos)
  • How to be happy in Holland, by Pogany (the first one I’ve read when moving to the NL. It was a gift from my to-be parents-in-law. It was a nice gesture, since I was coming to live with their son…)
  • Talking Dutch, by Daniels (obviously about the language)
  • Living in Holland, from Nuffic (practical survival guide)
  • Inside Information, by Curtis & Dhyks-Corkum (VERY practical)
  • Only in Holland, Only the Dutch, by Resch (funny read)
  • Living with the Dutch, by Norean Sharpe (good ideas, even if a bit dry in style for my taste)
  • The Undutchables, by White & Boucke (always funny)

Now that I have a list I can go back to, I can return the books to where they belong: the bookcase. At least until I have the time to browse through them and read more carefully. After the NaNoWriMo franctic, I guess…

I’ve gotten a whole list of books…

to help me write about the Netherlands and all, but they are so many that sometimes it is too much. And since I’ve started with that NaNoWriMo thing, there’s no coming to my main idea of writing about my life here. Ah, well, I guessed (and guessed right, I should tell) it would just help me clearing up the thoughts and open my mind to different possibilities.

  • Dutch Sense, by Ayoodeji O. (historical info)
  • Murder in Amsterdam, by Ian Buruma (about Theo Van Gogh etc.)
  • Dealing with the Dutch, by Jacob Vossestein (a bit obvious, right?)
  • Culture Shock! Netherlands, by Janin & Van Eil (survival guide, full with how-tos)
  • How to be happy in Holland, by Pogany (the first one I’ve read when moving to the NL. It was a gift from my to-be parents-in-law. It was a nice gesture, since I was coming to live with their son…)
  • Talking Dutch, by Daniels (obviously about the language)
  • Living in Holland, from Nuffic (practical survival guide)
  • Inside Information, by Curtis & Dhyks-Corkum (VERY practical)
  • Only in Holland, Only the Dutch, by Resch (funny read)
  • Living with the Dutch, by Norean Sharpe (good ideas, even if a bit dry in style for my taste)
  • The Undutchables, by White & Boucke (always funny)

Now that I have a list I can go back to, I can return the books to where they belong: the bookcase. At least until I have the time to browse through them and read more carefully. After the NaNoWriMo franctic, I guess…

Still more readings

As it is usual with me, I read different books at the same time. Like 3 or 5… And today I figured out I’ve been reading more in two months that I’ve ever been able to read in the past 4 years! It certainly has to do with not having time for it before. Now that I have a bit of time, and no study to make me crazy with all sorts of stuff, I can read almost anything, anywhere.

So here another small list, with some pictures, if I’m lucky enough (translation: if I manage to work out the upload URL pictures):

  • Urban Shaman, by C.E. Murphy. It’s about a lady who finds out, during a near-death experience, she can heal: herself, people, and probably the world. Nicely written, fast but not too much, it’s a good read for before going to bed.
  • Memories of my Melancholy Whores, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. In his free and sometimes almost absurd narrative, Gabriel Garcia Marquez is always surprising in his choice of themes and the way he uses them.
    In this new book, the memoirs of a ninety year old man, he makes an evaluation of the choices we maken in our youth and through the years. Choices that unwillingly return to haunt us at some point. That no deed goes unpunished, even the smallest ones. But the most important of all: that life is to be lived to the fullest and anything that differs from that is a waste of time and energy.
    Wonderful book. Read for work, so I would write a small comment on it (just did!) to be published on the website of The Hague OnLine. I still need to find the right website, sorry about that…
  • I’m still reading O Alquimista (badly written in Portuguese, but it seems the translation is pretty good), A asa esquerda do anjo and the newspaper in the train… 😉

Reading

At the moment I’m reading a few books, 3 to be correct:

A asa esquerda do anjo, by Lya Luft, a wonderful Brazilian writer. For myself. It’s about a young Brazilian girl growing up in a family dominated by the hardned matriarch, a German old lady. It’s about being different, thinking different, and how you survive in a oppressive world.

O alquimista, by Paulo Coelho, a famous Brazilian writer. For a book club (first time I’m going to one!) Too bad he writes as if his reader doesn’t understand what he’s talking about…

What the bleep do we know?, by a couple of writers (dont’ remember their names…). It’s a book about the film with same name that talks about beliefs, ideas, questions and lots more. For myself. I’m still trying to define what I think about it… Have to read more to be sure.